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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 336-341

Influence of implant dimensions in the resorbed and bone augmented mandible: A finite element study


1 Department of Dento-alveolar and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dentures Technology, Faculty of Dental Medicine, University of Medicine and Pharmacy “Grigore T. Popa,” Iasi, Romania
2 Department of Implantology, Removable Dentures, Dentures Technology, Faculty of Dental Medicine, University of Medicine and Pharmacy “Grigore T. Popa,” Iasi, Romania
3 Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medical Bioengineering, University of Medicine and Pharmacy “Grigore T. Popa”, Iasi, Romania

Correspondence Address:
Assistant Prof. SÓnziana Anca Butnaru Moldoveanu
Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medical Bioengineering, University of Medicine and Pharmacy “Grigore T. Popa,”-9-16 M. Kogalniceanu Street, 700454 Iasi
Romania
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_366_19

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Aims: The scope of this study was to analyze the influence of clinically feasible implant diameter and length on the stress transmitted to the peri-implant bone in the case of a resorbed and bone augmented mandible through finite element analysis. Settings and Design: The study was carried out in silico. Subjects and Methods: Resorbed and bone-augmented 3D models were derived from in vivo cone-beam computed tomography scans of the same patient. Corresponding implant systems were modeled with the diameter ranging from 3.3 to 6 mm and length ranging from 5 to 13 mm, and masticatory loads were applied on the abutment surface. Statistical Analysis Used: None. Results: In the bone augmented ridge, maximum stress values in the peri-implant region drastically decreased only when using implants of a diameter of 5 mm and 6 mm. Implants up to 4 mm in diameter led to comparable stress values with the ones obtained in the resorbed ridge, when using the larger implants. The increase of length reduced stress in the resorbed mandible, whereas in the bone augmented model, it led to small variations only in implants up to 4 mm in diameter. Conclusions: It was concluded that bone augmentation provides the optimal framework for clinicians to use larger implants, which, in turn, reduces stress in the peri-implant region. Diameter and length play an equally important role in decreasing stress. Implant dimensions should be carefully considered with ridge geometry.


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