Contemporary Clinical Dentistry

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2019  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 24--30

Fluoride and thyroid function in children resident of naturally fluoridated areas consuming different levels of fluoride in drinking water: An observational study


Naseemoon Shaik1, Raghavendra Shanbhog1, B Nandlal1, HM Tippeswamy2 
1 Department of Pediatric Dentistry, JSS Dental College and Hospital, JSS Academy of Higher Education and Research, Mysore, Karnataka, India
2 Department of Public Health Dentistry, JSS Dental College and Hospital, JSS Academy of Higher Education and Research, Mysore, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Raghavendra Shanbhog
Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, JSS Dental College and Hospital, JSS Academy of Higher Education and Research, Mysore, Karnataka
India

Background: Literature shows association between systemic fluorides and endocrine disorders especially related to thyroid, with lack of clarity. Aims and Objectives: The aim and objective of this study was to estimate serum triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxin, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), fluoride, calcium, phosphate, and alkaline phosphatase levels among children with normal nutritional status and optimal iodine intake residing in three different ranges of drinking water fluoride levels. Materials and Methods: The present double-blinded, observational trial comprised of 293 children aged between 9 and 13 years consuming naturally fluoridated water of three different ranges: Group I: 0.01–0.6 parts per million (ppm), Group II: 0.7–1.2 ppm, and Group III: 1.3–1.8 ppm. For each child's demographic data, body mass index and Clinical Fluorosis Index were recorded along with serum T3, T4, TSH, fluoride, calcium, phosphate, and serum alkaline phosphatase levels. Data were analyzed using Chi–square test, Kruskal–Wallis test, and repeated measures ANOVA with SPSS 23. Results: For serum TSH levels, 40% of children in Group I had deranged levels followed by Group III (20%) and Group II (16%). For serum T4 levels, 24% of children of both Groups I and III had deranged levels followed by Group II (20%). Intergroup correlation of drinking water fluoride levels to the number of deranged serum T3, T4, and TSH of the children showed nonsignificant association. Serum T3, calcium, phosphate, and alkaline phosphatase levels in all children showed values falling within normal range. Conclusion: According to the present study results, long-term intake of fluoridated drinking water (0.02–1.4 ppm) did not show effect on the thyroid function in children with normal nutritional status and optimal iodine intake.


How to cite this article:
Shaik N, Shanbhog R, Nandlal B, Tippeswamy H M. Fluoride and thyroid function in children resident of naturally fluoridated areas consuming different levels of fluoride in drinking water: An observational study.Contemp Clin Dent 2019;10:24-30


How to cite this URL:
Shaik N, Shanbhog R, Nandlal B, Tippeswamy H M. Fluoride and thyroid function in children resident of naturally fluoridated areas consuming different levels of fluoride in drinking water: An observational study. Contemp Clin Dent [serial online] 2019 [cited 2020 Jan 25 ];10:24-30
Available from: http://www.contempclindent.org/article.asp?issn=0976-237X;year=2019;volume=10;issue=1;spage=24;epage=30;aulast=Shaik;type=0