Contemporary Clinical Dentistry

CASE REPORT
Year
: 2013  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 353--355

Removable molar power arm


Raj Kumar Verma, Ashok Kumar Jena, Satinder Pal Singh, Ashok Kumar Utreja 
 Unit of Orthodontics, Oral Health Sciences Centre, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India

Correspondence Address:
Ashok Kumar Utreja
Unit of Orthodontics, Oral Health Sciences Centre, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Sector 12, Chandigarh
India

Abstract

Attachment of force elements from the gingival hook of maxillary molar tubes during the retraction of the anterior teeth is very common in orthodontic practice. As the line of force passes below the center of resistance (CR) of molar, it results its mesial tipping and also anchorage loss. To overcome this problem, the line of force should pass along the CR of molar. This article highlights a method to overcome this problem by attaching a removable power arm to the headgear tube of molar tube during the retraction of the anterior teeth.



How to cite this article:
Verma RK, Jena AK, Singh SP, Utreja AK. Removable molar power arm.Contemp Clin Dent 2013;4:353-355


How to cite this URL:
Verma RK, Jena AK, Singh SP, Utreja AK. Removable molar power arm. Contemp Clin Dent [serial online] 2013 [cited 2020 May 31 ];4:353-355
Available from: http://www.contempclindent.org/text.asp?2013/4/3/353/118341


Full Text

 Introduction



Upright position of the upper molars during retraction of anterior teeth in maximum anchorage cases is very critical in orthodontics. [1] In day to day clinical practice retraction force is usually applied from the power arm attached between maxillary lateral incisor and canine to the gingival hook of maxillary molar tube [2] [Figure 1]. As the force is applied below the center of resistance (CR) of maxillary molars, they tend to tip mesially during the space closure and uprighting of molars is often required during the finishing stage. [3] Also it leads to anchorage loss. Thus to overcome these problems, the force on molars should be applied at their CR, which is at the trifurcation areas. [4],[5] Recently, in a case report Vibhute designed molar stabilizing power arm made up of rectangular stainless steel wire to be engaged in the miniscrew implant head slot and in the auxillary molar tube for optimizing anterior en mass retraction. [6],[7] Here in this clinical tip, we have presented a method to prepare a removable power arm that can be attached to the headgear tube of molar tube during the retraction of anterior teeth.{Figure 1}

 Fabrication Steps



Take an approximately 3.5 cm of 21 gauge hard stainless steel wire.Then make a "C" shaped hook at its one end and then give 90° bend approximately 6-8 mm below the neck of "C" shaped hook [Figure 2].Then do the stress relieving heat treatment and now the power arm is ready for use.{Figure 2}

 Clinical Application



First insert the horizontal arm of the power arm in the round tube of the headgear tube from distal aspect [Figure 3]a and then keeping the vertical arm upright, place a 90° bend to horizontal arm at the mesial end of headgear tube [Figure 3]b so that the mesial and distal arms are parallel to each other and care should be taken that the height of the mesial vertical arm of the power arm is slightly above the gingival hook of the molar tube.Then ligate the mesial vertical arm of the power arm with the gingival hook of the molar tube by ligature wire [Figure 3]c.Now force can be applied from the power arm to the intermaxillary hook for the retraction of anterior teeth [Figure 3]d.{Figure 3}

 Advantages



Easy to fabricate and use in busy clinical practiceHeight of power arm can be adjusted depending on the requirement in individual cases. For example distal movement of the molar crown (uprighting) can be done by keeping the height of power arm above the CR of molars during retraction of anterior teethNo special armamentarium is required for its fabricationCan be prepared and stocked.

 Limitation



Can cause irritation in the sulcus when either the sulcus depth is less or the height of power arm is very high.

 Conclusion



The fabrication and clinical use of this power arm in maxillary first molars during the retraction of anterior teeth is very promising in routine orthodontic practice.

References

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2Dragiff DA. Technique clinic. Bending the round wire intermaxillary hook. J Clin Orthod 1975;9:578-9.
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