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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 99-104

Prevalence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in oral and nasal cavities of 4 to 13-year-old rural school children: A cross-sectional study


1 Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, Sri Sai College of Dental Surgery, Vikarabad, Hyderabad, Telangana, India
2 Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, Narayana Dental College and Hospital, Nellore, Andhra Pradesh, India; Department of Preventive Dental Science, College of Dentistry, Majmaah University, Al-Zulfi, KSA

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Srinivas Namineni
Department of Pedodontics, and Preventive Dentistry, Sri Sai College of Dental Surgery, Vikarabad, Hyderabad, Telangana
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_452_18

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Aim: This study aimed to investigate the oral and nasal prevalence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus(CA-MRSA) in 4 to 13-year-old rural schoolchildren. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 children aged 4 to 13 years were randomly selected and divided into ten groups based on their age (Group 1 = 4-year-old children to Group 10 = 13-year-old children). From each participating child, sampling was done from the anterior nares and dorsum of the tongue. All samples were inoculated into Baird–Parker agar medium and HiCrome™ MeReSa agar medium for the isolation of SA and MRSA. Both the culture plates were checked for the presence of SA and MRSA and overall SA and MRSA carriage. The distribution of SA and MRSA was evaluated. Descriptive statistics were performed using SPSS software (version 17.0). Results: Overall SA in 4–13 years' age group was 47%, while CA-MRSA was 35%. On the tongue, 16 children had concomitant MRSA and SA, while only 23.8% (n = 20) of the children comprised the presence of SA when MRSA was absent (P < 0.001). In the nasal cavity, 30 children had concomitant MRSA and SA, while only 21.4% (n = 15) of the children had the presence of SA when MRSA was absent (P < 0.001). When tongue and nose were assessed, 11 children encompassed concomitant MRSA and SA, while only 16.9% (n = 13) of the children had the presence of SA when MRSA was absent in both sites (P < 0.001). Conclusion: A significant relation was found between nasal SA and CA-MRSA carriage, with oral SA and CA-MRSA carriage. The study concludes that oral cavity is possibly as important as the nasal area as a zone of SA and MRSA. Dentists dealing with pediatric population should take proper precautions to prevent cross contamination of SA and MRSA in the dental clinic.


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