Contemporary Clinical Dentistry
   
  Home | About us | Editorial board | Search
Ahead of print | Current Issue | Archives | Advertise
Instructions | Online submission| Contact us | Subscribe |

 

Login  | Users Online: 278  Print this pageEmail this pageSmall font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size 

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 24-30

Fluoride and thyroid function in children resident of naturally fluoridated areas consuming different levels of fluoride in drinking water: An observational study


1 Department of Pediatric Dentistry, JSS Dental College and Hospital, JSS Academy of Higher Education and Research, Mysore, Karnataka, India
2 Department of Public Health Dentistry, JSS Dental College and Hospital, JSS Academy of Higher Education and Research, Mysore, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Raghavendra Shanbhog
Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, JSS Dental College and Hospital, JSS Academy of Higher Education and Research, Mysore, Karnataka
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_108_18

Rights and Permissions

Background: Literature shows association between systemic fluorides and endocrine disorders especially related to thyroid, with lack of clarity. Aims and Objectives: The aim and objective of this study was to estimate serum triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxin, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), fluoride, calcium, phosphate, and alkaline phosphatase levels among children with normal nutritional status and optimal iodine intake residing in three different ranges of drinking water fluoride levels. Materials and Methods: The present double-blinded, observational trial comprised of 293 children aged between 9 and 13 years consuming naturally fluoridated water of three different ranges: Group I: 0.01–0.6 parts per million (ppm), Group II: 0.7–1.2 ppm, and Group III: 1.3–1.8 ppm. For each child's demographic data, body mass index and Clinical Fluorosis Index were recorded along with serum T3, T4, TSH, fluoride, calcium, phosphate, and serum alkaline phosphatase levels. Data were analyzed using Chi–square test, Kruskal–Wallis test, and repeated measures ANOVA with SPSS 23. Results: For serum TSH levels, 40% of children in Group I had deranged levels followed by Group III (20%) and Group II (16%). For serum T4 levels, 24% of children of both Groups I and III had deranged levels followed by Group II (20%). Intergroup correlation of drinking water fluoride levels to the number of deranged serum T3, T4, and TSH of the children showed nonsignificant association. Serum T3, calcium, phosphate, and alkaline phosphatase levels in all children showed values falling within normal range. Conclusion: According to the present study results, long-term intake of fluoridated drinking water (0.02–1.4 ppm) did not show effect on the thyroid function in children with normal nutritional status and optimal iodine intake.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed662    
    Printed48    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded67    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal