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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 554-559

Influence of toothpaste pH on its capacity to prevent enamel demineralization


1 Study of Dental Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Split, Split, Croatia
2 Department of Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dental Medicine, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia
3 Department of Clinical Sciences and Translational Medicine, University of Rome‘Tor Vergata’, Rome, Italy; Specialist Orthodontic Practice, London, England, UK

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Kristina Gorseta
Department of Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dental Medicine, University of Zagreb, Gunduliceva 5, 10000, Zagreb
Croatia
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_667_18

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Aim: This study evaluated in vitro the remineralization capacity of commercial toothpastes with different fluoride (F) concentrations and their effectiveness when they are acidified. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twelve caries-free teeth were used to prepare enamel specimens, and the specimens were divided into 16 groups (n = 7). Baseline surface Vickers microhardness was measured for all the specimens and all the tested groups were subjected to the pH-cycling regime involved five demineralization challenges each day for 10 days, and surface Vickers microhardness was then measured. Once daily, specimens were exposed for 30 min after last demineralization challenge of the day to the slurry of each toothpaste containing 1450 ppm F, 1000 ppm F, 450 ppm F, and 0 ppm F. The slurry was in original pH or acidulated on 6.5, 6.0, or 5.5 pH. The difference among tested group was assessed by analysis of variance and Newman–Keuls test (P < 0.05). Results: The highest increase in microhardness was detected after treatment with toothpaste containing 1450 ppm fluoride (percentage of increase in microhardness was 6.20%), and the biggest loss was detected after treatment with toothpaste containing no fluoride (percentage of decrease was 6.82%), but there was no significant difference between tested groups. Conclusions: The highest increase in microhardness was detected after treatment with toothpaste containing more fluorides (1450 ppm F) regardless of the acidity.


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