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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 5-9

Detection of Hepatitis C Virus RNA in blood and saliva of transfusion-dependent thalassemia patients diagnosed with Hepatitis C


1 Department of Periodontics, School of Dentistry, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
2 Baqiyatallah Research Center for Gastroenterology and Liver Disease, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
3 School of Dentistry, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
4 Department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Farnaz Kouhestani
Department of Periodontics, School of Dentistry, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran
Iran
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ccd.ccd_297_17

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Background: The aim of the current study was to detect hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA in blood and saliva of a population of patients with thalassemia who have HCV antibody in their serum. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, blood and saliva samples were collected and were analyzed with quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for the detection of HCV RNA. In addition, liver-related blood tests were performed, and patients' medical history was recorded. Data were analyzed by independent samples t-test and Chi-square with a significant level of 0.05. Results: Overall, 62 adult patients (29 males and 33 females) were included. Most (87%) of the patients had major thalassemia and genotype 1a was the most common (42%) type. HCV RNA was detected in 71 and 16% of blood and saliva samples, respectively. HCV RNA was detected more in female patients (31%) (P = 0.003) and in intermediate thalassemia (50%) (P < 0.005). The mean age of the patients with positive saliva was almost 10 years older (P < 0.001), and the mean number of blood transfusion was fewer in positive saliva group (P = 0.037). The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of saliva PCR was calculated to be 18%, 88%, 80%, and 69%, respectively. Conclusion: Saliva contained HCV RNA in 16% of the assessed population. The probability of detection of HCV RNA in saliva increased in older patients, less number of blood transfusions, females and intermediate thalassemia. Saliva RT-PCR demonstrated low sensitivity and high specificity with high positive predictive value in the assessed population.


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