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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 500-504

A clinicomicrobiological study to evaluate the efficacy of manual and powered toothbrushes among autistic patients


1 Department of Periodontology, Jodhpur Dental College General Hospital, Jodhpur, Rajasthan, India
2 Department of Periodontology, JSS Dental College and Hospital, Mysore, Karnataka, India
3 Department of Microbiology, JSS Medical College and Hospital, Mysore, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
Mayuri Vajawat
Room No 3, Ground Floor, Jodhpur Dental College General Hospital, Jodhpur, Rajasthan
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0976-237X.169848

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Aim: To compare the efficacy of powered toothbrushes in improving gingival health and reducing salivary red complex counts as compared to manual toothbrushes, among autistic individuals. Materials and Methods: Forty autistics was selected. Test group received powered toothbrushes, and control group received manual toothbrushes. Plaque index and gingival index were recorded. Unstimulated saliva was collected for analysis of red complex organisms using polymerase chain reaction. Results: A statistically significant reduction in the plaque scores was seen over a period of 12 weeks in both the groups (P < 0.001 for tests and P = 0.002 for controls). This reduction was statistically more significant in the test group (P = 0.024). A statistically significant reduction in the gingival scores was seen over a period of 12 weeks in both the groups (P < 0.001 for tests and P = 0.001 for controls). This reduction was statistically more significant in the test group (P = 0.042). No statistically significant reduction in the detection rate of red complex organisms were seen at 4 weeks in both the groups. Conclusion: Powered toothbrushes result in a significant overall improvement in gingival health when constant reinforcement of oral hygiene instructions is given.


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